Recent Advances

June 9, 2013

Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have deciphered how a protein called Arc regulates the activity of neurons—providing much-needed clues into the brain’s ability to form long-lasting memories. 

May 15, 2013

Lennart Mucke, MD, who directs neurological research at the Gladstone Institutes, today received the MetLife Foundation’s 2013 Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease at a scientific briefing and awards ceremony in New York.

March 25, 2013

Shinya Yamanaka next month will receive the Essey Award for his “Commitment to a Cure” from The ALS Association Golden West Chapter. This annual award represents the exceptional determination, spirit and dedication to the fight against amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

March 24, 2013

Gladstone scientists have discovered that a certain type of DNA damage long thought to be particularly detrimental to brain cells can actually be part of a regular, non-harmful process. The team further found that disruptions to this process occur in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease—and identified two therapeutic strategies that reduce these disruptions.

December 6, 2012

Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have identified a novel mechanism by which a type of low-carb, low-calorie diet—called a “ketogenic diet”—could delay the effects of aging. 

December 5, 2012

Gladstone Investigators Robert Mahley, MD, PhD, and Yadong Huang, MD, PhD, describe the process by which an important protein, known as apoE4, promotes the development of Alzheimer’s and recommend a renewed focus on a strategy that could fundamentally change the course of the disease’s progression.

December 4, 2012

The ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI) and the Gladstone Institutes today announced the formation of a research collaboration to speed the discovery of potential treatments for ALS through the preclinical drug development process. 

November 27, 2012

Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have defined for the first time a key underlying process implicated in multiple sclerosis.

October 28, 2012

Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes and the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered how modifying a gene halts the toxic buildup of a protein found in nerve cells. These findings point to a potential new tactic for treating a variety of neurodegenerative conditions, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease)—a fatal disease for which there is no cure. 

October 8, 2012

Gladstone scientists have discovered how a protein deficiency may be linked to frontotemporal dementia (FTD)—a form of early-onset dementia that is similar to Alzheimer’s disease.