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Yamanaka

PRESS RELEASE

Gladstone Scientist Wins Nobel Prize for Medicine
San Francisco, CA—October 8, 2012
Shinya Yamanaka MD, PhD, a senior investigator at the Gladstone Institutes has won the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of how to transform ordinary adult skin cells into cells that, like embryonic stem cells...

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NOBEL IN THE NEWS

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House of Japan
December 10, 2012
Yamanaka voices determination to apply iPS cells to cure diseases
Stem cell researcher Shinya Yamanaka, a co-recipient of this year's Nobel Prize in medicine, on Friday expressed his resolve to apply artificially derived multipurpose stem cells to cure debilitating diseases for which effective treatments have yet to be found.

The San Francisco Chronicle
October 17, 2012
Yamanaka invented cell time machine
Last week, Yamanaka was awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for his work creating induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells—his technique could allow scientists to explore human diseases like they never have before, or help doctors regenerate tissue lost to injury or illness.

The San Francisco Chronicle
October 17, 2012
Unlocking secret to making stem cells
In 2006, a year after hinting what he was working on, Shinya Yamanaka published a striking paper in the journal Cell, outlining in detail how he'd managed to transform a skin cell from a mouse into a stem cell. From there, he showed that the stem cell could be coaxed into becoming any other type of cell in the body.

The New Scientist
October 10, 2012
Medicine Nobel: good choice, but will cures come soon?
Leading biologists are praising the selection of John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their work on cellular reprogramming—turning adult cells back to an embryonic state. But one of the laureates is worried that regulatory red tape could delay treatments based on the work.

San Jose Mercury News
October 9, 2012
Disease cures seen in reprogrammed cells
Researchers John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka on Monday shared a Nobel prize for their research in reprograming cells. Many scientists built on Gurdon's work in the pursuit of curing diseases and perhaps one day generating replacement organs for humans.

Bloomberg
October 9, 2012
Nobel Winner's Stem Cells to Be Tested in Eye Malady in 2013
Stem cells derived from a mouse's skin won Shinya Yamanaka the Nobel Prize yesterday. Now researchers in Japan are seeking to use his pioneering technology for an even greater prize: restoring sight.

New York News Day
October 9, 2012
Nobel winner Shinya Yamanaka's stem cell research to be used for retina damage trial
Stem cells derived from a mouse's skin won Shinya Yamanaka the Nobel Prize Monday. Now researchers in Japan are seeking to use his pioneering technology for an even greater prize: restoring sight.

The Guardian
October 9, 2012
Nobel prize in physiology or medicine 2012: as it happened
Shinya Yamanaka and John B Gurdon are the winners of the 2012 Nobel prize in physiology or medicine.

The San Jose Mercury News
October 9, 2012
Nobel in medicine for Japanese researcher with Bay Area connection
A Japanese researcher with ties to the Bay Area joined a British researcher as winners of this year's Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine on Monday for discovering that ordinary cells can be turned into stem cells, capable of building any kind of tissue—a discovery likely to lead to new treatments.

Fuji TV
October 8, 2012
Reaction from Colleagues and Mentors on Shinya Yamanaka's Nobel Win
Fuji TV interviews Dr. Yamanaka's Gladstone colleagues and fellow researchers. (In Japanese)

The San Francisco Chronicle
October 8, 2012
Nobel medicine prize goes to SF scientist
Sir John Gurdon, who now works at the University of Cambridge, and Shinya Yamanaka, a researcher with appointments at Kyoto University in Japan and the Gladstone Institutes and UCSF in San Francisco, together altered scientists' understanding of basic cell biology and unleashed the potential of stem cells to transform modern medicine.

Salon
October 8, 2012
Stem cell pioneers win Nobel Prize
Sir John Gurdon from the U.K. and Shinya Yamanaka from Japan were announced Monday as this year's medicine prizewinners for their work on turning adult cells back into stem cells.

PBS News Hour
October 8, 2012
Stem Cell Scientists Gurdon and Yamanaka Win Nobel Prize in Medicine
England's Sir John Gurdon and Dr. Shinya Yamanaka from Japan share the 2012 Nobel Prize in medicine for work on stem cells, revealing that mature cells can be reverted into primitive cells.

The San Francisco Chronicle
October 8, 2012
Researcher wins Nobel award
Gladstone and UCSF researcher has been awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for his discovery that ordinary human cells can be reprogrammed into stem cells, possibly leading to new breakthrough medical treatments.

Nature
October 8, 2012
Cell rewind wins medicine Nobel
The discovery that cells can be reprogrammed to an embryonic-like state has won this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for two leading lights of stem-cell research: John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka.

Japan Times
October 8, 2012
Yamanaka, Gurdon share Nobel Prize in medicine for stem-cell research
Shinya Yamanaka of Japan and John Gurdon of Britain shared the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent," the Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm said Monday.

Wall Street Journal
October 8, 2012
Scientists Win Nobel Prize for Stem-Cell Work
John B. Gurdon of the U.K. and Shinya Yamanaka of Japan shared this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their work in so-called cellular reprogramming, which has unleashed a wave of advances in everything from cloning to the possible treatment of diseases using stem cells.

BBC
October 8, 2012
Gurdon and Yamanaka share Nobel prize for stem cell work
Two pioneers of stem cell research have shared the Nobel prize for medicine or physiology.

ABC News Australia
October 8, 2012
Stem cell revolutionaries win Nobel medicine prize
Two doctors from Japan and Britain have been awarded this year's Nobel Prize for Medicine for their groundbreaking work on stem cells.

France 24
October 8, 2012
UK's Gurdon, Japan's Yamanaka win Nobel Prize for medicine
John Gurdon of Cambridge University and Shinya Yamanaka (pictured) of the Gladstone Institutes and Japan's Kyoto University have won the Nobel Prize for medicine for their work on stem cells, discovering that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become any tissues of the body.

The Daily Mail
October 8, 2012
Brit and Japanese scientists share Nobel Prize for 'groundbreaking' stem cell work that 'revolutionised' science
Sir John Gurdon, 79, shared the Nobel Prize with Japan's Shinya Yamanaka for their "groundbreaking work" that has "revolutionised science", the Nobel Assembly at Sweden's Karolinska Institute said.

The Los Angeles Times
October 8, 2012
Nobel Prize goes to pioneers of induced stem cell research
John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on Monday for their research on resetting cells to their earliest developmental stages.

Reuters
October 8, 2012
UK, Japan scientists win Nobel for stem cell breakthroughs
Scientists from Britain and Japan shared the Nobel Prize in Medicine on Monday for the discovery that adult cells can be reprogrammed back into stem cells which can turn into any kind of tissue and may one day repair damaged organs.

Washington Post
October 8, 2012
Nobel Prize for medicine awarded to Gurdon, Yamanaka for stem cell discoveries
British scientist John Gurdon and Japanese researcher Shinya Yamanaka shared the 2012 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine Monday for experiments separated by almost 50 years that provide deep insight into how animals develop and offer hope for a new era of personalized medicine.

Toronto Star
October 8, 2012
Stem-Cell pioneers from Britain, Japan win medical Nobel Prize
John B. Gurdon transferred DNA between a tadpole and a frog to cloned the first animal. Shinya Yamanaka used Gurdon's concept to turn ordinary skin into potent stem cells. Both won the Nobel Prize for medicine Monday.

Japan Daily Press
October 8, 2012
Nobel medical prize awarded to Japan's Yamanaka, U.K.'s Gurdon for stem cell research
The Nobel Prize in medicine was jointly awarded to researcher Shinya Yamanaka of Japan and John Gurdon of Britain on Monday in Stockholm, Sweden.

The New York Times
October 8, 2012
Cloning and Stem Cell Discoveries Earn Nobel in Medicine
A pair of landmark discoveries made 40 years apart have earned the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for John B. Gurdon of the University of Cambridge in England and Shinya Yamanaka of the Gladstone Institutes and Kyoto University in Japan.

The Economist
October 8, 2012
The Nobel prize for physiology or medicine
This year's Nobel physiology prize goes to Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for a crucial discovery in stem-cell science—how to make what are known as pluripotent stem cells from ordinary body cells.

Bloomberg
October 8, 2012
Stem-Cell Pioneers Gurdon, Yamanaka Win Nobel Prize
John B. Gurdon transferred DNA between a tadpole and a frog to clone the first animal. Shinya Yamanaka used Gurdon's concept to turn ordinary skin into potent stem cells. Both won the Nobel Prize for medicine today.

The Boston Herald
October 8, 2012
John Gurdon, Shinya Yamanaka win Nobel medicine prize
British researcher John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka of Japan have won this year's Nobel Prize in medicine or physiology.

The Guardian
October 8, 2012
Nobel prize won by Briton written off in his teens by a science teacher
Sir John Gurdon shares the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine with Shinya Yamanaka, for reprogramming adult cells.

NBC News
October 8, 2012
Nobel Prize awarded for stem cell breakthroughs
Scientists from Britain and Japan shared a Nobel Prize on Monday for the discovery that adult cells can be transformed back into embryo-like stem cells that may one day regrow tissue in damaged brains, hearts or other organs.

CNN
October 8, 2012
Nobel Prize in medicine awarded to Sir John Gurdon, Shinya Yamanaka
The 2012 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine was awarded Monday to Sir John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for work that revolutionized the understanding of how cells and organisms develop.

CNBC
October 8, 2012
Gurdon and Yamanaka win Nobel prize for medicine
Briton John Gurdon and Japanese scientist Shinya Yamanaka won the 2012 Nobel prize for medicine or physiology for research which revolutionized understanding of how cells and organisms develop, the award-giving body said on Monday.

Huffington Post
October 8, 2012
Nobel Prize In Medicine 2012: John Gurdon, Shinya Yamanaka Win For Cell Research
British researcher John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka of Japan won this year's Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday for discovering that mature, specialized cells of the body can be reprogrammed into stem cells—a discovery that scientists hope to turn into new treatments.


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Media Contacts

Gladstone

For more information about Dr. Yamanaka's research, please contact media relations at (415) 734-2532 or press@gladstone.ucsf.edu. Someone from press relations will respond to you as quickly as possible.

STEM CELL EXPERTS

Gladstone Experts

To reach any of these Gladstone scientists, please call Gladstone's press office. (415) 734-5000

Expert Deepak Srivastava, MD
Director and Senior Investigator
Gladstone Institute of
Cardiovascular Disease

Full Bio

Expert Bruce Conklin, MD
Senior Investigator
Gladstone Institute of
Cardiovascular Disease

Full Bio

Expert Sheng Ding, PhD
Senior Investigator
Gladstone Institute of
Cardiovascular Disease

Full Bio

Expert Steve Finkbeiner, MD, PhD
Associate Director and Senior Investigator
Gladstone Institute of
Neurological Disease

Full Bio

Expert Yadong Huang, MD, PhD
Associate Investigator
Gladstone Institute of
Neurological Disease

Full Bio

Expert Robert W. Mahley, MD
President Emeritus and
Senior Investigator
Gladstone Institutes of
Cardiovascular Disease andNeurological Disease

Full Bio

Expert R. Sanders Williams, MD
President

 

Full Bio

Non-Gladstone Experts

Gladstone recommends these leading
stem cell experts as resources for journalists

Arnold Kriegstein, MD, PhD
Director of the Eli and Edythe Broad
Center of Regeneration Medicine
and Stem Cell Research
University of California, San Francisco
Contact: Jennifer O'Brien
(415) 516-1915
jennifer.obrien@ucsf.edu
 
George Daley, MD, PhD
Samuel E. Lux Chair of Hematology
Director, Stem Cell
Transplantation Program
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
and Children's Hospital Boston
(616) 919-2015
Daley.lab@childrens.harvard.edu
 
Irving Weissman, MD
Director, Institute of Stem Cell Biology
and Regenerative Medicine
Director, Stanford Ludwig Center
for Stem Cell Research
Professor of Pathology and
Developmental Biology
Stanford University School of Medicine
(650) 723-6520
irv@stanford.edu
 
Fred H. Gage, PhD
Professor, Vi and John Adler
Chair for Research on Age-Related
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Salk Institute for Biological Studies
(858) 453-4100, ext. 1012
gage@salk.edu
 
Janet Rossant, PhD
Chief of Research,
The Hospital for Sick Children
Professor of Medical
Genetics & Microbiology
and Obstetrics & Gynecology
University of Toronto
(416) 813-7929
janet.rossant@sickkids.ca

IMAGES


We allow use of our images only for non-commercial educational purposes, and for use by news organizations for the limited purpose of their news reporting; provided, that in no event may such images be sold, licensed or otherwise distributed apart from the related educational or news content. No image may be used to explicitly or implicitly suggest endorsement of commercial goods or services by the Gladstone Institutes. Unless otherwise noted, please credit the image: Copyright ©, Gladstone Institutes.

For further questions regarding use of these images, please contact the Gladstone press department at press@gladstone.ucsf.edu.


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Caption: Presentation of crystal bowls to Dr. Shinya Yamanaka and Sir John Gurdon by the Gladstone Institutes, ISSCR and the Roddenberry Stem Cell Center at Gladstone, at the ISSCR-Roddenberry International Symposium on Cellular Reprogramming on October 24, 2012.

Credit: Gladstone Institutes/Chris Goodfellow

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Caption: Dr. Shinya Yamanaka presenting at the ISSCR-Roddenberry International Symposium on Cellular Reprogramming on October 24, 2012.

Credit: Gladstone Institutes/Chris Goodfellow

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Caption: Sir John Gurdon presenting at the ISSCR-Roddenberry International Symposium on Cellular Reprogramming on October 24, 2012.

Credit: Gladstone Institutes/Chris Goodfellow

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Caption: Dr. Shinya Yamanaka and Sir John Gurdon at the Gladstone Institutes press conference on October 24, 2012, in conjunction with the ISSCR-Roddenberry International Symposium on Cellular Reprogramming.

Credit: Gladstone Institutes/Chris Goodfellow

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Caption: Shinya Yamanaka, MD, PhD

Credit: Gladstone Institutes/Chris Goodfellow

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Caption: Shinya Yamanaka, MD, PhD

Credit: Gladstone Institutes/Chris Goodfellow

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Caption: Shinya Yamanaka, MD, PhD

Credit: Gladstone Institutes/Chris Goodfellow

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Caption: Shinya Yamanaka, MD, PhD

Credit: Gladstone Institutes/Chris Goodfellow

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Caption: Shinya Yamanaka, MD, PhD

Credit: Gladstone Institutes/Chris Goodfellow

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Caption: Induced pluripotent stem cells—known as iPS cells, and which act very much like embryonic stem cells—are here growing into heart cells (blue) and nerve cells (green).

Credit: Gladstone Institutes/Shiro Baba

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Caption: In this microscopic image, human skin cells are being reprogrammed into brain cells. The red cells are just becoming neurons, while the green cells are further along in the same process.

Credit: Gladstone Institutes/Conklin Lab

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Caption: Induced pluripotent stem cells—known as iPS cells, and which act very much like embryonic stem cells—are here growing into heart cells (blue) and nerve cells (green).

Credit: Gladstone Institutes/Jin Lee

 

VIDEO


Shinya Yamanaka & John Gurdon at Gladstone

The ISSCR-Roddenberry International Symposium on Cellular Reprogramming at Gladstone on Oct. 24 and 25 provided an opportunity for the two laureates of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to meet for the first time since winning the award. We captured some highlights of the meeting of Gladstone Senior Investigator Shinya Yamanaka, MD, PhD, and Sir John Gurdon in a press conference. A few highlights are posted here.


Nobel Announcement

On October 8th, 2012, it was announced that Gladstone Senior Investigator Shinya Yamanaka, MD, PhD is the co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine along with Sir John Gurdon.


Gladstone Research