Gladstone in the News

The Gladstone Institutes is gratified to receive media attention from around the globe. Check out the highlights of recent press coverage of Gladstone scientists and research. For other news, please be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Cells' Fiery Suicide in HIV Provides New Treatment Hope
December 19, 2013

The difference between HIV infection and full-blown AIDS is, in large part, the massive die-off of the immune system’s CD4 T-cells. But researchers have only observed the virus killing a small portion of those cells, leading to a longstanding question: What makes the other cells disappear? New research shows that the body is killing its own cells in a little-known process. What’s more, an existing, safe drug could interrupt that self-destruction, thereby offering a way to treat AIDS.

The Noisy Mass Suicide That Leads to AIDS
December 19, 2013

Warner Greene from the Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology has been trying to solve the mystery of HIV inffection for years, and he thinks he has finally cracked it. In two papers, published simultaneously in Science and Nature, his team lays out why HIV kills so many bystander cells and, better still, a possible way of stopping it.

HIV infection causes immune cells to self-destruct, study says
December 19, 2013

Scientists say they have discovered a key process by which the AIDS virus kills key immune cells: It triggers a preprogrammed self-destruct sequence within the cell that is intended to alert fellow immune cells of a crisis.

Gladstone HIV researchers target Vertex drug for clinical trial
December 19, 2013

An anti-inflammatory drug shelved by Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc. after a mid-stage study in epilepsy patients could be the next big HIV treatment.

Taking Drug to Prevent HIV Doesn't Seem to Encourage Risk-Taking
December 18, 2013

Should people in danger of contracting HIV because they have risky sex take a pill to prevent infection, or will the medication encourage them to take even more sexual risks? After years of debate on this question, a new international study suggests the medication doesn't lead people to stop using condoms or have more sex with more people.

Taking HIV prevention pill may not encourage risky sex - U.S. study
December 18, 2013

Taking a pill as a preventive measure against HIV infection may not encourage people at high risk for the disease to engage in risky sexual behavior, according to a new U.S. study meant to address fears about its use.

Does Truvada, The HIV-Prevention Pill, Increase Sexually Risky Behavior?
December 18, 2013

In July 2012, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Truvada, the first and only drug intended to prevent HIV infection. Now, a new study provides more proof that regular use of Truvada (emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) can reduce an individual’s risk of contracting HIV by more than 90 percent. Importantly, the researchers also found that use of the pill does not equate to an increase in risky sexual behavior.

HIV Prevention Pill Truvada Does Not Lead to Sexual Risk-taking
December 18, 2013

The HIV prevention drug Truvada does not increase risky sexual behaviour, scientists have confirmed.

New Approach To Alzheimer's Treatment Offers Hope
December 11, 2013

Health research backer Wellcome Trust awarded Dr. Robert Mahley of the Gladstone Institutes its Seeding Drug Discovery Award on Monday. The $2.5 million grant gives Mahley’s team three years to develop its novel approach to treating Alzheimer’s disease.

Molecular Sensor Finds Early Signs of Multiple Sclerosis in the Brain
December 11, 2013

Researchers at Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco have created a molecular sensor that can detect multiple sclerosis (MS) early. The method is so precise that MS can be tracked long before disease onset when a patient first presents with symptoms.