Gladstone in the News

The Gladstone Institutes is gratified to receive media attention from around the globe. Check out the highlights of recent press coverage of Gladstone scientists and research. For other news, please be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Britain's John Gurdon, Japan's Shinya Yamanaka share 2012 Nobel Prize in medicine
October 8, 2012

British researcher John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka of Japan won this year's Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday for discovering that mature, specialized cells of the body can be reprogrammed into stem cells — a discovery that scientists hope to turn into new treatments.

British-Japanese duo win Nobel for stem cell research
October 8, 2012

Shinya Yamanaka of Japan and John B. Gurdon of Britain won the Nobel Medicine Prize on Monday for their groundbreaking work on stem cells, the jury said.

SF researcher wins Nobel Prize in medicine
October 8, 2012

Dr. Shinya Yamanaka of San Francisco's Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco won the Nobel Prize for discovering a way to turn adult human cells back into the equivalent of stem cells. 

Nobel Prize in medicine awarded to Sir John Gurdon, Shinya Yamanaka
October 8, 2012

The 2012 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine was awarded Monday to Sir John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for work that revolutionized the understanding of how cells and organisms develop.

Nobel Prize awarded for stem cell breakthroughs
October 8, 2012

Scientists from Britain and Japan shared a Nobel Prize on Monday for the discovery that adult cells can be transformed back into embryo-like stem cells that may one day regrow tissue in damaged brains, hearts or other organs.

Stem Cell Experts John Gurdon, Shinya Yamanaka Share Nobel Prize For Medicine
October 8, 2012

The Nobel Prize in Physiology/Medicine 2012 was awarded jointly to two pioneers of stem cell research -- Briton John B. Gurdon and Japan's Shinya Yamanaka -- for the discovery that mature, specialized cells can be reprogrammed to become immature cells capable of developing into all tissues of the body.

Pioneering stem cell work earns Yamanaka, Gurdon Nobel Prize
October 8, 2012

Discoveries that gave mankind a new power to control the most fundamental unit of our bodies, allowing scientists to rewind a cell back to its embryonic origin or push it forward to become skin, blood or dozens of other cell types claimed the 2012 Nobel Prize in Medicine awarded to Shinya Yamanaka of Japan and John Gurdon of Britain.

Cell Reprogramming Work Wins Nobel
October 8, 2012

John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka jointly take home this year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine for turning back the developmental clock.

Analysis: Reprogrammed cells open new medical window
October 8, 2012

The Nobel Prize-winning discovery of how to reprogram ordinary cells to behave like embryonic stem cells offers a way to skirt around ethical problems with human embryos, but safety concerns make their future use in treating disease uncertain.

UK's Gurdon, Japan's Yamanaka win Nobel Prize for medicine
October 8, 2012

John Gurdon of Cambridge University and Shinya Yamanaka (pictured) of the Gladstone Institutes and Japan’s Kyoto University have won the Nobel Prize for medicine for their work on stem cells, discovering that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become any tissues of the body.